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Time on the Grass
Time on the Grass
By Gavin Blackwell
Saturday 21 March 20 I 08:53:22 I Photo by

Everyone Can Appreciate Music but Not Everyone Can Play A Musical Instrument 

 

The value of practical experience is summed up by the wonderful Spanish proverb: “It is not the same to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring”.

 

Likewise, in football it is important to appreciate the experiential knowledge of those who have played in front of crowds, or coached, refereed in a decisive match or treated an injured player on the field.

 

The pitch people, particularly those who have the communication skills to convey their know-how, have much to offer.

 

The players are too busy trying to win games and to survive the demanding effects of an overcrowded football calendar. They are the ones that suffer most throughout a gruelling season, because they in demand and who are expected to satisfy the expectations of the public, the media, the owners and team-mates.

 

Managers and coaches are always talking it is the nature of their business particularly when signing players or scrutinising future opponents.

 

The referees and medical staff are also people of the grass and they too have lots to offer. One of the games top former referees Pierluggi Colina, came up with referees studying teams’ tactical ploys that they often use in games and how it may or may not influence the referee’s decision-making process at both the Euros and the World Cup.

 

Professor Jan Ekstrand, former Swedish national team doctor, completed a study of injury patterns in UEFA Champions league by analysing the relationship of football injuries and different playing surfaces and climatic conditions.

 

Everyone can appreciate music but not everyone can play a musical instrument.

 

The same applies to football. One of the best examples of this is Saturday Night you’re on your way home from a game, and the radio is on, a phone-in starts. On they come, the armchair experts: ‘he’s taken the club as far as he can go’,  ‘he picked the wrong team’, ‘he put the subs on too late’, ‘he puts his subs on too early’, ‘he’s tactically naive’, ‘he just hasn’t got a clue’.

 

The calls may be about Ole Gunnar Solksjar, Dean Smith or Darrell Clarke, there are two jobs everyone thinks they can do, be Prime Minister or a football manager.

 

It doesn’t matter how many trophies and promotions they have won; they know better. But they don’t because they are daft - most football fans can see when a team is struggling, and some can work out why but because they will never have the whole story. Maybe a defender was left out because he has a personal problem maybe a substitution had to be made as the midfielder was carrying an injury. There are a lot of things going on at a football club most of which, for all sorts of reasons, the fans don’t hear about it.

 

It’s not necessary to have been a great coach to have an informed opinion about the game. Like Joe Royle once said: `I would never tell a plumber, a lawyer or a journalist to do his job, but they all know better than me every Saturday`.

 

There are many officials, journalists and members of the public who have, through years of observation, developed an educated, perceptive `football eye`. However, those who are veterans of the battle, on the pitch and on the bench have a special insight into the subtleties and intricacies of the game.

 

Of course, the observer has the advantage of seeing the bigger picture and of offering objective analysis, but to repeat the Spanish maxim: ‘It is not the same to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring`.

 

(Gavin Blackwell has been involved in the game for over 30 years and has shown great dedication during that time as the physio for a handful of non-League clubs, most notably Halesowen Town, but also Oldbury United, Tividale, Stourbridge and Hednesford Town, as well as assisting the Wolves academy and WBA reserves.)

Copyright Non League Today. Permission to use quotations from this article is granted subject to appropriate credit being given to the Non League Today website as the source and a link back to the Non League Today website.
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Time on the Grass
Time on the Grass
Saturday 21 March 20 I 08:53:22
Photo by

Everyone Can Appreciate Music but Not Everyone Can Play A Musical Instrument 

 

The value of practical experience is summed up by the wonderful Spanish proverb: “It is not the same to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring”.

 

Likewise, in football it is important to appreciate the experiential knowledge of those who have played in front of crowds, or coached, refereed in a decisive match or treated an injured player on the field.

 

The pitch people, particularly those who have the communication skills to convey their know-how, have much to offer.

 

The players are too busy trying to win games and to survive the demanding effects of an overcrowded football calendar. They are the ones that suffer most throughout a gruelling season, because they in demand and who are expected to satisfy the expectations of the public, the media, the owners and team-mates.

 

Managers and coaches are always talking it is the nature of their business particularly when signing players or scrutinising future opponents.

 

The referees and medical staff are also people of the grass and they too have lots to offer. One of the games top former referees Pierluggi Colina, came up with referees studying teams’ tactical ploys that they often use in games and how it may or may not influence the referee’s decision-making process at both the Euros and the World Cup.

 

Professor Jan Ekstrand, former Swedish national team doctor, completed a study of injury patterns in UEFA Champions league by analysing the relationship of football injuries and different playing surfaces and climatic conditions.

 

Everyone can appreciate music but not everyone can play a musical instrument.

 

The same applies to football. One of the best examples of this is Saturday Night you’re on your way home from a game, and the radio is on, a phone-in starts. On they come, the armchair experts: ‘he’s taken the club as far as he can go’,  ‘he picked the wrong team’, ‘he put the subs on too late’, ‘he puts his subs on too early’, ‘he’s tactically naive’, ‘he just hasn’t got a clue’.

 

The calls may be about Ole Gunnar Solksjar, Dean Smith or Darrell Clarke, there are two jobs everyone thinks they can do, be Prime Minister or a football manager.

 

It doesn’t matter how many trophies and promotions they have won; they know better. But they don’t because they are daft - most football fans can see when a team is struggling, and some can work out why but because they will never have the whole story. Maybe a defender was left out because he has a personal problem maybe a substitution had to be made as the midfielder was carrying an injury. There are a lot of things going on at a football club most of which, for all sorts of reasons, the fans don’t hear about it.

 

It’s not necessary to have been a great coach to have an informed opinion about the game. Like Joe Royle once said: `I would never tell a plumber, a lawyer or a journalist to do his job, but they all know better than me every Saturday`.

 

There are many officials, journalists and members of the public who have, through years of observation, developed an educated, perceptive `football eye`. However, those who are veterans of the battle, on the pitch and on the bench have a special insight into the subtleties and intricacies of the game.

 

Of course, the observer has the advantage of seeing the bigger picture and of offering objective analysis, but to repeat the Spanish maxim: ‘It is not the same to talk of bulls as to be in the bullring`.

 

(Gavin Blackwell has been involved in the game for over 30 years and has shown great dedication during that time as the physio for a handful of non-League clubs, most notably Halesowen Town, but also Oldbury United, Tividale, Stourbridge and Hednesford Town, as well as assisting the Wolves academy and WBA reserves.)

Copyright Non League Today. Permission to use quotations from this article is granted subject to appropriate credit being given to the Non League Today website as the source and a link back to the Non League Today website.
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